Tinseltown comes to the mountain

A group of Hollywood executives visit Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station, Colo., for a tour of the complex, July 18, 2017. The tour was conducted as part of an outreach program to Hollywood screenwriters, producers and directors in an effort to give Hollywood an inside look into the Air Force space mission and ensure that any projects they produce can be represented accurately. (U.S. Air Force photo by Steve Kotecki)

A group of Hollywood executives visit Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station, Colo., for a tour of the complex, July 18, 2017. The tour was conducted as part of an outreach program to Hollywood screenwriters, producers and directors in an effort to give Hollywood an inside look into the Air Force space mission and ensure that any projects they produce can be represented accurately. (U.S. Air Force photo by Steve Kotecki)

CHEYENNE MOUNTAIN AIR FORCE STATION, Colo. --

A group of about 40 Hollywood screen writers, producers and directors visited Cheyenne Mountain Air Force Station, Colorado, and were given a tour of the facility, July 18, 2017, to get a better sense of military life.

The visit to Cheyenne Mountain AFS was part of a three-day tour of Air Force space assets designed to show entertainment industry notables the space mission of the Air Force.

The tour included a visit with the 50th Space Wing at Schreiver Air Force Base, Colorado and to meet with members of the 13th Air Support Operation Squadron at Fort Carson, Colorado.

The tour was then taken through CMAFS where they were educated on its construction, history, and saw firsthand how the complex maintains vigilance through their workings inside of America’s fortress.  

The tour was coordinated through the Air Force Entertainment Liaison Office to give members of the entertainment industry a look inside how the Air Force operates and what makes the Air Force unique amongst the service branches.

Tours like this are designed to get Hollywood excited to tell the Air Force story and also ensure that our story is told accurately.

“With an increasingly wide civil-military gap in our country, the Air Force’s relationship with storytellers is vitally important in fostering public understanding of our service and what we do,” said 1st Lt. Travis Schirner, Air Force Entertainment Liaison Office project officer. “Trips like these open the eyes of culture-defining individuals and assist in their efforts to provide authentic depictions of our Airman.”

Although they weren’t shown the Stargate they did have stops at the gym, chapel, generator room, and the underground lake, the tour was even able to see and touch the blast doors that keep the complex safe from enemy strikes.

Some of the other things the tour found interesting was the command board posted at the entrance of the entry control point, and the force protection condition codes that are posted in various locations.

After seeing Cheyenne Mountain up close and personal, members of the tour said they were excited to figure out how they could work the mission of Air Force Space Command into upcoming projects.