AFSPC celebrates AF first.

Master Sgt. Pete Norris, a crew commander assigned to the new Air Force Space Command Major Command Coordination Center (MCCC), reviews the AFSPC mission system network security posture on the MCCC head up display. The HUD facilitates tracking of mission system compliance with all security software updates. (U.S. Air Force photo by Capt. Joe Macri - photo cleared for release)

Master Sgt. Pete Norris, a crew commander assigned to the new Air Force Space Command Major Command Coordination Center (MCCC), reviews the AFSPC mission system network security posture on the MCCC head up display. The HUD facilitates tracking of mission system compliance with all security software updates. (U.S. Air Force photo by Capt. Joe Macri - photo cleared for release)

PETERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- On June 1, Air Force Space Command stood up a Major Command Communications Coordination Center (MCCC) creating a single focal point for all network systems across AFSPC.

At the direction of Headquarters Air Force, all MAJCOMs are required to consolidate their network operations and systems under an MCCC. The command’s MCCC will be the first of its kind in the Air Force, and could become a model for other MAJCOMs. The AFSPC effort is a major step in consolidating network operations across the Air Force.

According to Brig. Gen. Stephen Lanning, director of AFSPC Logistics and Communication, it makes sense that AFSPC would lead the way in standing up an MCCC.

“Our lifeblood dependence on communications networks for mission execution and the diversity of our mission networks, means our MCCC will likely be largest, the most encompassing, and the flagship MCCC in the Air Force,” said General Lanning.

There are currently more than 170 networks and systems within AFSPC, consolidating them will help standardize their operations, provide “one-stop shopping” for issues affecting the systems and provide greater oversight of systems across the board.

Network operations traditionally focused on classified and unclassified computer networks; however, AFSPC has several systems that operate autonomously from the traditional networks. This can cause problems when users try to track down problems in a particular system. It also meant there was no single way of doing business across the various networks and systems.

“Each system has its own points of contact and way of doing business” said Maj. Jeff Devine, chief of network architectures and standards for AFSPC. “If you have a problem with the Global Positioning System network, you have to figure out who runs the GPS network and go to them. If you have a problem with the Air Force Satellite Control Network, that’s another phone call. The MCCC will provide the warfighter a single focal point for all of these networks so that users know where to go for help, and commanders know what resources they have available at their fingertips.”

Commanders will be able to access a MCCC Web page on the Secret Internet Protocol Network, known as SIPRNET, which shows them the current status of all systems within AFSPC.

The command is spending approximately $750,000 to stand-up the MCCC. Most of this funding deploys new network monitoring tools to monitor the more-than 170 networks and systems. Manning for the center is coming from the existing Network Operations and Security Center. Although the MCCC will initially consolidate operations only, the eventual goal of AFPSC is to consolidate infrastructure which could result in significant cost savings.

Additionally, AFSPC has been selected to stand up one of two Integrated Network Operation and Security Centers (I-NOSCs) that will eventually become a hub for network operations across the Air Force. The other I-NOSC will be located at Langley Air Force Base, Va.