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Warren security forces keepin' it real

Airman Joseph Urednick, 790th MSFS, radios in his position near the resource vehicle. Team 4 leader Senior Airman Richard Phillips, 790th MSFS, “died” in the attack and kneels in position while help is on the way.

Airman Joseph Urednick, 790th Missile Security Forces Squadron, radios in his position near the resource vehicle. Team 4 leader Senior Airman Richard Phillips, 790th MSFS, “died” in the attack and kneels in position while help is on the way. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Darryl Knee)

Airman 1st Class Nicholas Harris, 90th Security Forces Group Tactical Response Force, and Senior Airman Jared Sweeney, 790th MSFS, secure the open door to the resource vehicle. The “terrorists” tried to attack the vehicle and take what was inside.

Airman 1st Class Nicholas Harris, 90th Security Forces Group Tactical Response Force, and Senior Airman Jared Sweeney, 790th MSFS, secure the open door to the resource vehicle. Exercise opponents tried to attack the vehicle and take what was inside. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Darryl Knee)

F.E. WARREN AIR FORCE BASE, Wyo. -- Members of the 790th Missile Security Forces Squadron regularly put their real-world skills to the test to test to ensure they can confront threats to the United States at any time. 

One such recent exercise was a simulated convoy attack at an abandoned launch facility in Wyoming. 

Instead of reading or hearing about what a unit can do together with the weopons they are issued, they can find out first hand. 

"It really puts our training to the test," said Staff Sgt. Casey Adams, 90th Security Support Squadron. 

Some members from the 790th MSFS are assigned to play the part of American Airmen on a mission and others act as the enemy. 

Using different scenarios trains different aspects of the job, Sergeant Adams said. Sometimes the scenario is to evacuate people, other times it's to escort sensitive material.  

The recent exercise tested Airmen escorting a resource vehicle in a convoy. Once the attack got going, the real training began. 

"This type of exercise really does prepare the Airmen in order to fight in a real-world environment," said Staff Sgt. Jon Becker, 90th Security Forces Group. "They have to know what procedures to take, and then execute them." 

Evaluators were on site to offer information on how certain procedures could be done more efficiently. The evaluators also shadowed the Airmen, confirming "kills." Any Airman that was "shot" had to play dead until the next exercise began. 

To make the process seem more realistic, the Airmen were fitted with multiple integrated laser engagement system gear. The MILES gear is designed to detect when the blanks shot from weapons would have actually hit their target. The gear beeps when bullets whiz near the Airman and projects a steady tone, not unlike a flat line, when the target has been killed. 

"We want the Airmen to believe that everything they do is important ... and realize that we train for a reason," Sergeant Adams said.